Car Rental

Most of the major car rental firms are well represented in Mexico. There are also localized independent operators in most cities. Make sure you know what you are getting in the way of insurance coverage when renting a car. Some credit card companies automatically cover you when you rent a car, but this insurance is not always valid in Mexico. Check with your credit card company, if you plan to rent a car in Mexico. You will need your U.S. drivers license (valid in Mexico) and a major credit card. Many companies also have minimum age limits for rentals in Mexico.

When vacationing in Mexico, you'll have plenty of options when it comes to getting where you want to go. The major car rental companies are all here, but why not try what savvy travelers know is the best way to get around: the motor coach. These are not the grimy buses you might be used to; they're more like luxury train cars, with big, comfy seats, refreshments and even in-cab movies.

The limitless places to explore in Mexico are really best seen by car. Be aware, though, that the driving laws and customs may be very different than what you're accustomed to. You'll need the following if you'd like to bring your own car across the border to explore Mexico's wonders:

  • - a temporary car permit (this can only be obtained at the Mexican border).
  • - a car insurance issued in Mexico (insurance of your country is not accepted).
  • - a valid driver’s license.
  • - a current car registration and an original car title (original is required).
  • - a valid International credit card.
  • - a temporary importation application.
  • - a signed declaration dated with your scheduled return to your country.

Travel Insurance

A little bit of forethought can save you and your fellow travelers a lot of expense and heartache in the unlikely event circumstances interfere with your vacation plans! Almost everyone has had a vacation that didn't go completely as planned. Maybe rain washed out a couple of days of a beach trip, or the van you had reserved turned out to be a compact sedan. These small "speed bumps" are a fact of life, but when the truly catastrophic interferes with your vacation, it will help your peace of mind greatly to have travel insurance to cover the money you've laid out in advance for things like airfare, hotels and other expenses. Don't let a canceled vacation also become a financial nightmare! Another insurance policy to keep in mind is car insurance. If you drive your own car into Mexico, your U.S. policy will not cover you. Shop online for the best prices for "vacation" insurance policies that will cover you at a reasonable rate. For last-minute needs, you can also purchase policies at most border crossings. Whatever your travel plans, work with your travel agent or vacation planner to make sure you are covered!

Translators

If you need a dedicated translator for your trip, consult your nearest Mexican consulate or embassy, where you can get a list of people certified as expert translators by the Mexican government. The list is free! As with any business, of course, you'll have to use your own good judgment as to who to hire, but the list is a good starting point. Any business and legal document translations must be certified through appropriate governmental channels, but any official translator will be able to guide you through the process. For tourist needs, you won't be likely to need a certified translator. In most towns, cities and resort areas you'll be able to find locals who can provide translation services for a small fee. Tip them as you would any other person providing a service and you'll find out all those great spots only the locals know!

Health Topics

Before traveling to Mexico (or anywhere abroad), it's a good idea to find out what immunizations you should have, or medications you should take along. A little advance preparation can do wonders! A visit with your doctor before you leave the country for any trip, not just to Mexico, is a good idea. Take along your itinerary and a description of the kinds of places you'll be visiting (mountains, jungles, deserts, etc.) along with a list of any special activities you're planning, such as bungee jumping.

Also keep in mind that most destinations away from the coast in Mexico are at high altitude. Your doctor can tell you what precautions you'll need to take and recommend things to help ease your transition to breathing at high altitude. The old saw about "don't drink the water" is still in effect. Stick to bottled water for drinking. However, high levels of cleanliness are prevalent in all food preparation facilities in the tourist hotels and restaurants, so eat, drink and be merry! It's best if you see your doctor 4-6 weeks before you travel, in case you need any vaccinations before your trip. This will allow time for them to take effect and, if you're taking a jungle trip, it will allow time for any anti-malarial drugs your doctor prescribes to be effective.

The Centers for Disease Control recommends that you see a health-care provider who specializes in Travel Medicine. Find a travel medicine clinic near you. If you have a medical condition, you should also share your travel plans with any doctors you are currently seeing for other medical reasons.
For more information: http://wwwn.cdc.gov/travel/destinationMexico.aspx

Plastic Surgery Destinations

Guadalajara, San Miguel de Allende Mexico

Medical tourists are US citizens venturing outside the United States for cosmetic surgery and other medical and dental procedures. Guadalajara is becoming the city to visit in Mexico, not for a vacation but rather for plastic surgery.

Surgery vacation packages to historic San Miguel de Allende are being offered that include air fare, surgery, spa treatments and tours. Medical tourism companies provide varying amounts of information about their doctors for clients who want to check out the qualifications of their surgeons. Some offer resumes and references from previous clients, while others provide little more than a doctor's name.

The draw of the surgery vacation for the medical tourist is not only the reduced cost of the surgery, but just as important, the discretion. Tour operators make planning for surgery south of the U.S. border as simple as booking a vacation.

Car Rentals/ Airport transfers/Private Driver

When vacationing in Mexico, you'll have plenty of options when it comes to getting where you want to go. The major car rental companies are all here, but why not try what savvy travelers know is the best way to get around: the motor coach. These are not the grimy buses you might be used to; they're more like luxury train cars, with big, comfy seats, refreshments and even in-cab movies.

The limitless places to explore in Mexico are really best seen by car. Be aware, though, that the driving laws and customs may be very different than what you're accustomed to. You'll need the following if you'd like to bring your own car across the border to explore Mexico's wonders:
- a temporary car permit (this can only be obtained at the Mexican border).
- a car insurance issued in Mexico (insurance of your country is not accepted).
- a valid driver’s license
- a current car registration and an original car title (original is required).
- a valid International credit card.
- a temporary importation application.
- a signed declaration dated with your scheduled return to your country.

All that may make a car rental sound like a great idea, and in fact it is! Rental cars are usually newer models, already inspected and equipped to travel the countryside. Your travel agent or tour broker will likely be able to offer you a package deal, with the car included in the price of your trip!

To ride in style, hire a private car with a driver. You'll be surprised how reasonable it can be, and you'll have a tour guide to show you all the spots the locals know and the tourists may never see!

Resorts and hotels will in most cases have airport transfers arranged for their guests. While making your reservations for your stay, the concierge staff will inquire as to your flight arrival and times.

If you have rented a private villa, inquire with the broker, or your travel professional as to airport transfers or ask them to schedule a private driver to meet you upon arrival.

Maps & Borders

The U.S./Mexico border is almost 2,000 miles, a huge open door inviting you to explore all that this fantastic country has to offer!

From San Diego and Tijuana in the west to Matamoros and Brownsville in the east, the territory directly along the U.S./Mexico border is rough and inhospitable, with very few urban areas. It's mostly desert, with the usual plant and animal life. The Rio Grande, which forms the border between Mexico and Texas, empties into the Gulf of Mexico near Brownsville and Matamoros. One of the main attractions along this famous waterway is at El Paso, Texas/Ciudad Juarez, Mexico. To the west, the border spans the vastness of the Chihuahuan and Sonoran deserts, the Colorado River delta and the northernmost tip of the Baja Peninsula before ending in the waves of the Pacific Ocean.

The Mexico border is served by a total of 23 crossings. Expect to pay a fee when crossing from either side. There are additional fees if you drive into Mexico from the U.S., and you'll need to purchase Mexican car insurance to cover you in Mexico. It's best to buy the insurance ahead of time online … you'll save a lot of money! For a really great trip, try one of Mexico's motor coach tours. These luxury buses are an economical and very personal way to experience the country up close and find those hidden spots most tourists never see.

All about Mexico has maps free for your convenience:
http://www.allaboutmexico.com/maps.html


Company U. S. Telephone
Alamo (800) 327-9633
Avis (800) 331-1212
Budget (800) 527-0700
Dollar (800) 800-4000
Hertz (800) 654-3131
National (800) 227-7368
Payless (800) 729-5377
Thrifty Car Rental (800) 367-2277
  • Intercontinental Hotel
  • Crowne Plaza Hotel
  • Indigo Hotel
  • Holiday Inn Hotel
  • Tropical Wedding Beach Cancun Mexico